USING YOUTUBE CHANNELS TO MARKET YOUR GAME… AND MORE…

I wouldn’t usually post something like this, but I thought this was very much worth sharing. Ryan Letourneau (who runs the successful Northern Lion channel on YouTube) takes us through some very concise and useful tips for getting things reviewed on YouTube. The principals shown here don’t only apply to game developers, but can also be relevant for musicians, filmmakers, product designers, or just about anything else a person might want to get exposure for.

Very valuable advice here! Thanks to Mike Bithell, the developer of the hit indie game Thomas Was Alone, for drawing my attention to this gem!

For those of you particularly interested in the gaming channels on YouTube, here’s that list of YouTubers.





Shylock - Backstop EP incl. Daou remix.

Shylock - Backstop EP on iTunes

So, Shylock’s Backstop EP is out now on a number of online music stores. On the B-side is ‘Leaving’, with a techno rework from myself.

Available on:

It was great fun to work with the material given to me by Shylock. Really enjoyed creating a dancefloor techno track out of something that’s originally more geared for listening. Thanks to Jo Wills and Guy Wood for being awesome label heads (WW Records), and putting on a great little shindig last Friday to celebrate the release. And massive props to the grammy-winning Matt Colton, at Alchemy Mastering, for doing what he does best.









THE LOST WORLD, LIVE AT THE BARBICAN CINEMA
So, this is the first post I’m making in relation to my new job as the research assistant at the Guildhall School of Music & Drama's Electronic Music Studios. I'm so happy and grateful to be one of those lucky musicians who, aside from freelance music work, has a flexible day job centred around music too. Whew!The second performance event I’ve been involved in for this job was on Sunday 9th June 2013, when the department put on a screening at the Barbican Cinema of The Lost World, a pioneering film made in 1925. It included never-before-seen stop-motion animation, and the creators were even able to blend live action with animated elements in the same frame (as seen in the above image). Willis Harold O’Brien, the man mainly responsible for the animation and visual effects in The Lost World also went on to animate King Kong. Both King Kong and Jurassic Park owe a great debt to The Lost World, and would probably not have been made had it not been for the technical and narrative inspiration provided by this film.
We screened the show on the Barbican cinema’s main screen, with students performing their own original music and electronic sound design live onstage. From a technical standpoint, this was an ambitious and elaborate performance. The onstage area was split into 3 zones:
1 - Acoustic instruments2 - Electronic instruments3 - Live sound design


Rehearsing at Guildhall

We used a SMPTE timecode signal, in audio form, to synchronise the computers onstage with the film, that was running from a DVD in the cinema. So, the SMPTE code came from the DVD, and was sent into the onstage computers. We used a small application called SMPTE Reader to convert SMPTE into MIDI timecode, which was then sent into a virtual MIDI port in Max/MSP. For anyone that ever needs to do something like this, I can’t recommend SMPTE Reader highly enough. It’s a small and simple application that does exactly what it says on the tin. As far as I could find, it was the only thing that could easily achieve what we wanted… and it’s free! There are a million different ways this can be useful.
Once we had MIDI timecode that was controlled by the timeline of the film, we were able to trigger events in Max in accordance with the onscreen action. We had a 5-strong team dedicated to live sound design, who relied on this system. For example, some were making sounds orally into a microphone, that were processed live to sound like dinosaur roars at the appropriate time. The timecode input enabled Max to switch to different processing settings ready for different scenes.
Below is a diagram showing how the equipment was routed onstage:

The SMPTE timecode signal from the DVD was sent to CPUs 1-5, where it was decoded to trigger parameter changes and offer a visual counter to guide the musicians using those machines. CPU1 made a submix onstage of the signals from CPUs 2-5, who were our live SFX team. CPUs 6-8 were delivering electronic musical elements, sub-mixed onstage with a small mixer. The 3 microphones were for live acoustic instruments. The headphone amp sent the click track from the DVD to the onstage musicians.
The equipment for this performance was fairly hefty, and we were very reliant on a great number of things not screwing up. In our final technical rehearsal on the day, it felt as though pretty much every element of the setup screwed up once at different points, but we’d managed to iron out the kinks very quickly and the performance went perfectly!

THE LOST WORLD, LIVE AT THE BARBICAN CINEMA

So, this is the first post I’m making in relation to my new job as the research assistant at the Guildhall School of Music & Drama's Electronic Music Studios. I'm so happy and grateful to be one of those lucky musicians who, aside from freelance music work, has a flexible day job centred around music too. Whew!

The second performance event I’ve been involved in for this job was on Sunday 9th June 2013, when the department put on a screening at the Barbican Cinema of The Lost World, a pioneering film made in 1925. It included never-before-seen stop-motion animation, and the creators were even able to blend live action with animated elements in the same frame (as seen in the above image). Willis Harold O’Brien, the man mainly responsible for the animation and visual effects in The Lost World also went on to animate King Kong. Both King Kong and Jurassic Park owe a great debt to The Lost World, and would probably not have been made had it not been for the technical and narrative inspiration provided by this film.

We screened the show on the Barbican cinema’s main screen, with students performing their own original music and electronic sound design live onstage. From a technical standpoint, this was an ambitious and elaborate performance. The onstage area was split into 3 zones:

1 - Acoustic instruments
2 - Electronic instruments
3 - Live sound design

Rehearsing at Guildhall

Rehearsing at Guildhall

We used a SMPTE timecode signal, in audio form, to synchronise the computers onstage with the film, that was running from a DVD in the cinema. So, the SMPTE code came from the DVD, and was sent into the onstage computers. We used a small application called SMPTE Reader to convert SMPTE into MIDI timecode, which was then sent into a virtual MIDI port in Max/MSP. For anyone that ever needs to do something like this, I can’t recommend SMPTE Reader highly enough. It’s a small and simple application that does exactly what it says on the tin. As far as I could find, it was the only thing that could easily achieve what we wanted… and it’s free! There are a million different ways this can be useful.


Once we had MIDI timecode that was controlled by the timeline of the film, we were able to trigger events in Max in accordance with the onscreen action. We had a 5-strong team dedicated to live sound design, who relied on this system. For example, some were making sounds orally into a microphone, that were processed live to sound like dinosaur roars at the appropriate time. The timecode input enabled Max to switch to different processing settings ready for different scenes.

Below is a diagram showing how the equipment was routed onstage:

Routing diagram for The Lost World event.

The SMPTE timecode signal from the DVD was sent to CPUs 1-5, where it was decoded to trigger parameter changes and offer a visual counter to guide the musicians using those machines. CPU1 made a submix onstage of the signals from CPUs 2-5, who were our live SFX team. CPUs 6-8 were delivering electronic musical elements, sub-mixed onstage with a small mixer. The 3 microphones were for live acoustic instruments. The headphone amp sent the click track from the DVD to the onstage musicians.

The equipment for this performance was fairly hefty, and we were very reliant on a great number of things not screwing up. In our final technical rehearsal on the day, it felt as though pretty much every element of the setup screwed up once at different points, but we’d managed to iron out the kinks very quickly and the performance went perfectly!

Onstage setup at the Barbican Cinema





Here’s a great video showing a series of metronomes running at the same speed, but at different phases, being brought into synchronisation with each other by sharing a freely-moving connector.  This will work with any physical oscillators.  It’s a great example of harmonic resonance, creating the lowest energy solution. Adam Micolich explains this beautiful concept very clearly. You can check out Adam’s YouTube channel for more interesting science vids.





Damn, I love watching all this mechanical shit!

The track is Machines by The Soft Moon. They’ve got loads more of these oldie black & white films set to their music. For their track Parallels, they’ve used Hans Richter’s Rhythmus 23.

A big fan of Richter myself, I’ve re-scored Rhythmus 23 and another of his films, Filmstudie.

















Another short fashion film I’ve worked on, this time for the 2013 Autum/Winter Collection from illustrious London-based Thai designer, SORAPOL.

This is the backstage film from the show, which is packed with some pretty magical images. In-keeping with the influences of the far East clearly at work in this collection, I’ve created a oriental themed score, which also aims to highlight the dramatic light and shade in the footage, as well as the beautiful close-ups of textiles and headdresses.

I collaborated on this score with Stuart Crowhurst, who provided the amazing epic drums and bell sounds.  I worked closely with the videographer/editor, Conor Gorman, bouncing ideas between one another, helping to shape the non-linear content of the film alongside the music, simultaneously.

===> Full credits:

Head Designer: Sorapol Chawaphatnakul
Creative Director: Daniel Lismore
Music: Jon Daou & Stuart Crowhurst
Backstage Videography, Edit & Production: Conor Gorman
Stylist: Karl Willett
Make Up: Illamasqua
Hair: Snowden Hill
Crocodile Bags: S’uvimol
Hoisery: Candy Baker
SORAPOL Jewellery: Nico Yang
3D Design & Fabrication: Adam Peacock
Headwear Design: Emily Frances Barrett
Illustration: Oat Montein
Choreography: Filip Jankovic
Show Videography & Production: Stagestruck
Show Music: Peter Wilson, Daniel Wilson
Show Videography & Production: Stagestruck
Press: Pop PR

NEXT INSTALMENT:
I’m in the process of remixing this music into something a little different, for the upcoming film of the actual ‘Immortal’ show.